Sizes for ski boots

If you’re heading to the slops this year you might find the chart that’s below handy. Traditionally sizing for ski boots was done with the Mondopoint scale. Mondopoint shoe size scale is actually the ISO standard which “is based on the mean foot length and width for which the shoe is suitable, measured in millimetres.”
skibook-size
But in case you are not used to the Mondopoint scale, we have put a lookup chart to translate it in to all the other popular scales.

Mondo (cm) Men (US) Women (US) European UK
15 8 (Kids’) 25 7
15.5 8 (Kids’) 25 7
16 9 (Kids’) 26 8
16.5 9 (Kids’) 26 8
17 10 (Kids’) 27 9
17.5 11 (Kids’) 28 10
18.5 12 (Kids’) 29 11
19.5 13 (Kids’) 30.5 12
20 13.5 (Kids’) 31 13
20.5 1 32 13.5
21 2 33 1
21.5 3 34 2
22 4 5 35 3
22.5 4.5 5.5 36 3.5
23 5 6 36.5 4
23.5 5.5 6.5 37 4.5
24 6 7 38 5
24.5 6.5 7.5 38.5 5.5
25 7 8 39 6
25.5 7.5 8.5 40 6.5
26 8 9 40.5 7
26.5 8.5 9.5 41 7.5
27 9 10 42 8
27.5 9.5 10.5 42.5 8.5
28 10 11 43 9
28.5 10.5 11.5 44 9.5
29 11 12 44.5 10
29.5 11.5 45 10.5
30 12 45.5 11
30.5 12.5 46 11.5
31 13 47 12
31.5 13.5 47.5 12.5
32 14 48 13
32.5 13.5 48.5 13.5
33 15 49 14
33.5 15.5 50 14.5
34 16 51 15

It can be handy to know your number if you are renting or buying boots for the first time. An experienced shop assistant will be able to tell you what size you are.

Another tip for ski boots is that generally the whole size and the half size are the same boot, with different thickness liners. So if the whole size is not available, the half size should be pretty close to your converted size.